Love's Labour's Lost - Stuff that Happens in the Play

True love ensues...

• The King of Navarre and the lords Longaville, Dumaine, and Berowne vow to study for three years, swearing off women for that period.  The King even bans women from within a mile of the court. 


• The impending diplomatic visit of the Princess of France threatens the King’s “no girls allowed” proclamation. 

• Costard, a country swain, has been found with Jaquenetta and arrested for breaking the new statute.  For his offense, the King puts Costard in the custody of Don Armado, who is in love with Jaquenetta.  
 
• The Princess of France arrives accompanied by her ladies, Maria, Katherine, and Rosaline.  The King courteously denies them entrance to the court, permitting them stay in his park instead. 

• Seeing the Princess, however, the King falls instantly in love with her. 

• Berowne and Rosaline renew their acquaintance; Longaville and Dumaine admire Maria and Katherine, respectively. 

• Don Armado releases Costard so that he can bear Armado’s love letter to Jaquenetta.  Before Costard can accomplish this task, however, Berowne meets Costard and gives him a letter for Rosaline. 

• Costard delivers the letter intended for Jaquenetta to the Princess, though he announces that the letter is from Berowne to Rosaline. 

• Holofernes, the local schoolmaster, and Sir Nathaniel, the parson, discover that Costard has mixed up the letters. 

• Alone, Berowne reads some verses he has written in praise of Rosaline.  The King, Longaville, and Dumaine, each thinking himself alone, reveal their own passions. 

• Jaquenetta and Costard deliver Berowne’s letter to Rosaline.  

• The King and his lords decide to forget their vows  and pursue their beloveds.  

• Don Armado reveals to Holofernes, Sir Nathaniel, Dull, Moth, and Costard that, at the King’s request, he is preparing an entertainment for the ladies of France. 

• Disguises, tricks, pageantry and the course of true love ensue.

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