7,200+ lines to memorize during
120+ hours of rehearsal for
6 shows (and 2 showcases) – that’s
4 productions in
3 weeks for
2 sessions, all adding up to
1 unforgettable summer

Each show page contains a general (and flippant) description of the play, bolstered by a note straight from each director. The show pages in this section include  full-length online editions of the six shows comprising the 2019 ASCTC summer season. (The scripts that we use at camp will be cut to a one-hour performance length.)

Campers should read all of the plays in their session before arriving for orientation, and we highly recommend campers bring a hard-copy of Shakespeare’s Complete Works (any edition will do – we recommend the Arden) to camp to use for classes, workshops, and general reference.

Did I love til now? Forswear it, sight.
For I never saw true beauty til this night.

Is there anything more rash than young love? Shakespeare’s timeless classic about the perils of puberty follows teenage lovers Romeo and Juliet through their tumultuous, ill-fated relationship: from meeting to matrimony to mortally wounded in just three days. Forbidden from each other’s arms by their feuding families, the desperate lovers defy mounting odds — death threats, marriage proposals, meddling friars, Tybalt (it’s all fun and games until somebody gets killed) — in order to be together, only to be felled at the last by a mixup at the post office. Their love may have been brief and stupid, their deaths senseless and sad, but their story lives forever in the hearts and minds of every hormonal human that has ever said, “I love you.”


Romeo & Juliet

by William Shakespeare

Directed by: TBA
Assistant Directors: TBA
Production Intern: TBA
Click to read the full text

Who will believe thee, Isabel?
My unsoiled name, the austereness of my life,
My vouch against you, and my place in the State
Will so your accusation overweigh,
That you shall stifle in your own report,
And smell of calumny.

The Duke of Vienna is displeased with the crime rates (particularly of the fornication variety) in his city, but he doesn’t want to crack the whip of the law himself. Enter Angelo, the deputy, who’s already foaming at the mouth to enforce the city’s arcane sex-prohibiting laws when the Duke puts him in charge and slips off to take a monastic vacation (aka, disguise himself as a friar to spy on Angelo). Angelo wastes no time in making an example of Claudio, who’s gotten his girlfriend pregnant before he can afford to marry her (though he totally intends to!) and so winds up on Angelo’s death row. Desperate, Claudio sends word to his sister Isabella — she’s got a great head for ecclesiastical arguments, and Claudio thinks Angelo will listen to her. It probably doesn’t hurt that she’s about to be initiated into a convent as a nun. She goes to Angelo to plead Claudio’s case, and ends up provoking the Puritan’s lust instead. After talking with her, Angelo decides to “give his sensual race the reign”: he tells Isabella he will free Claudio if she has sex with him. What’s an almost-nun to do? Turn to bed tricks, head tricks, and divine intervention.


Measure for Measure

by William Shakespeare

Directed by: TBA
Assistant Directors: TBA
Production Intern: TBA
Click to read the full text

For this is infallible: that love conquereth all things but itself, and ladies all hearts but their own.


Gallathea

by John Lyly

Director: TBA
Assistant Directors: TBA
Production Intern: TBA
Click to read the full text

And since I cannot prove a love
To entertain these fair, well-spoken days
I am determined to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days…

It all comes down to this. The War of the Roses has raged and raged for more than a generation. Yorks and Lancasters have been mowing each other down faster than their revenges can take root, and finally — finally! — the Yorks emerge victorious. Edward Plantagenet, eldest son of the late Duke of York, becomes King Edward IV, and his younger brother Richard can finally put down his weapons and rest his weary hump and withered arm in a peaceful England made glorious summer by the sunny son of York.

Or not.

The final chapter in Shakespeare’s epic history cycle follows the last leg of misshapen Dick’s journey to the crown he swore would one day be his, no matter how many of his own family members stand in the way.


Richard III

by William Shakespeare

Directed by: TBA
Assistant Directors: TBA
Production Intern: TBA
Click to read the full text

My tongue will tell the anger of my heart
Or else my heart, concealing it, will break
And rather than it shall, I will be free
To the uttermost, as I please, in words.

Christopher Sly is drunk.

That’s how this play starts. With a drunk guy and a bunch of rich dudes who find him passed out in the gutter and decide to play a practical joke on him: they take him home, dress him up, and gaslight him into believing he’s somebody he’s not. Part of the charade involves hiring a troupe of actors to put on a play for him, called The Taming of the Shrew.

In the play within the play of The Taming of the Shrew, everybody wants to marry Bianca. And can you blame them, really? She seems super great. (Spoiler alert: maybe she is and maybe she isn’t.) Nobody wants to marry Bianca’s older sister, Katherine. And can you blame them, really? She seems super awful. (Spoiler alert: maybe she is and maybe she isn’t.) This is a problem for the girls’ father, Baptista, who decides to kill two birds with one stone (or sell two daughters with one pricetag) by forbidding Bianca to marry before Katherine does. Bianca’s desperate suitors team up to find a match for Katherine the Catch, which is how we get Petruchio. Several weddings later, we’re left asking the questions: do any of these people really love (or even know) each other? What does it mean really love (or even know) yourself? And what the heck happened to Christopher Sly?


THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

by William Shakespeare

Director: TBA
Assistant Directors: TBA
Production Intern: TBA
Click to read the full text

Sh’ has a bold spirit that mingles with mankind,
But nothing else comes near it: and oftentimes
Through her apparel somewhat shames her birth,
But she is loose in nothing but in mirth.


The Roaring Girl

by Thomas Dekker and Thomas Middleton

Directed by: TBA
Assistant Directors: TBA
Production Intern: TBA
Click to read the full text